Facet Cup Mute for Trumpet

Facet Cup Mute for Trumpet

When Facet Mutes began, the task of describing the individual hardwoods, and how to choose the best one for your needs, seemed fairly easy. However, after five years of helping players choose the best hardwo...

Model : [MuteTptF]
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This product was updated in our catalog on Wednesday 22 May, 2019

When Facet Mutes began, the task of describing the individual hardwoods, and how to choose the best one for your needs, seemed fairly easy. However, after five years of helping players choose the best hardwood mutes, some rhyme and reason began to emerge. Although it remains Harry Potter-like, in that “The mute chooses the player”, there is some logic that can be used. Let’s begin by breaking it down by instrument… first, the trumpet… then, the trombone.

For the trumpet player, we’ll use Walnut as our middle ground, or dividing point, and offer an opinion on hardwood choices for individual player types.

Starting from $179.00 (inc GST)

Hardwoods that have a lower density than Walnut… e.g., Spanish Cedar, Sitka Spruce, Lacewood, and Limba… tend to work better for trumpet players whose sound concept is more symphonic in nature. Generally, larger volume mouthpieces are used, and the desire is to create a warmer, and fuller sound. For this type of player, when auditioning mutes that are higher in density than Walnut, the upper and lower register notes have a tendency towards being lower on the pitch, and there is a feeling of resistance.

For trumpet players who tend to use smaller mouthpieces, or whose sound concept is more focused (or, perhaps due to a slightly smaller oral cavity?), a higher density hardwood than Walnut can be used… e.g., Zebrawood, Jatoba/Brasilian Cherry, Wenge, or African Rosewood/Bubinga. These higher density hardwoods provide a better match to this type of player, by helping to maintain the focused sound. Conversely, when auditioning mutes that are lower in density than Walnut, the upper and lower register notes have a tendency towards being lower on the pitch, and a general lack of focus.

With regard to cup mutes, it is our opinion that a hardwood with a bit more focus could be used by someone who uses a lower density straight mute. And, for players who require a higher density straight mute, a slightly lower density cup mute can be used.

We currently stock the Walnut, Limba, Wenge, Sitka Spruce, Lacewood, and Chicago Jazz Philharmonic straight mutes, but can also order in Bubinga, Limba, Padauk, Maple, and Zebrawood.